Deschutes River Recording Reunion: Laura Gibson Recap, Huichica Music Festival & More

Last Friday we had the privilege of watching the powerful and talented Laura Gibson perform at our pub in Bend. Laura’s performance was the last stop on our monthly First Friday Art Walk and she helped us kick off the release of our well-loved Twilight Summer Ale. Laura’s roots run deep in our own backyard: she spent this past February at Caldera in the mountains of Central Oregon, writing and reflecting on her work. Last summer we traveled with her out to Smith Rock to record the third installment of Deschutes River Recordings, a unique partnership between Northwest musicians and the Deschutes River Conservancy to create songs by the river, for the river. We were thrilled to welcome her back to Bend to perform the latest from her album La Grande (aptly named after a small town in Eastern Oregon).

Eric Earley

Artist Profile

In the second of the series, Blitzen Trapper’s singer/strummer/sage puts a rough-hewn spin on “Up on Cripple Creek.” From rural Oregon roots through early praise as Pitchfork’s “best new music”, Eric and band have grown into one of indie rocks most respected artists. Cripple Creek is an apt choice, as Eric explores themes of roots, nostalgia and romance in the latest Blitzen Trapper album American Goldwing. As he puts it, “The earthiness of these songs makes you want to get loaded and get in a fight, or find a girl or fall in love forever, simultaneously.”

The river called. The indie community answered.

Deschutes River Recordings is a unique collaboration between artist and cause. Deschutes Brewery put out the call for independent artists to sing river-themed songs, from the banks of the river, to benefit the vital work of the Deschutes River Conservancy. They’re musicians as committed to the cause as they are the craft. And fearless enough to tackle whatever covers Deschutes Brewery fans tossed their way. Welcome to the riverside high wire: live, unadorned, far from a studio safety net.

Laura Gibson

Artist Profile

Our third session presents Laura Gibson with a spiritual cliffside take on “Down by The Riverside.” The pairing dovetails nicely with the themes explored in her latest album La Grande. “It’s an album about strength and confidence - about the tension between wildness and domesticity and the courage required to embark upon either path, about asserting one’s will rather than submitting.” The video’s eclectic makeup teases at La Grande’s lush explorations of vocal layers, organ, vibraphone, synthesizer, marimba, even marching drum. Simple solo finger-picking set momentarily aside, Gibson has arrived at a conflux of old-time and avant garde all her own.

The river called. The indie community answered.

Deschutes River Recordings is a unique collaboration between artist and cause. Deschutes Brewery put out the call for independent artists to sing river-themed songs, from the banks of the river, to benefit the vital work of the Deschutes River Conservancy. They’re musicians as committed to the cause as they are the craft. And fearless enough to tackle whatever covers Deschutes Brewery fans tossed their way. Welcome to the riverside high wire: live, unadorned, far from a studio safety net.

Eric D. Johnson

Artist Profile

In the first of the series, the Fruit Bats frontman puts his own laconic signature on The Byrds’ “Ballad of Easy Rider.” Consummate musician, Shins sideman, respected songwriter and film composer Eric D. Johnson and band have just released their 5th album on Seattle’s famed Sub Pop label. From soaring pop confections to darker, rootsier explorations, he traverses genre and instrument with a savant’s unlikely ease.

The river called. The indie community answered.

Deschutes River Recordings is a unique collaboration between artist and cause. Deschutes Brewery put out the call for independent artists to sing river-themed songs, from the banks of the river, to benefit the vital work of the Deschutes River Conservancy. They’re musicians as committed to the cause as they are the craft. And fearless enough to tackle whatever covers Deschutes Brewery fans tossed their way. Welcome to the riverside high wire: live, unadorned, far from a studio safety net.

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